Welcome, 

To Stoke Skeptics in the Pub, the first (and hopefully not last) Skeptics in the Pub group to be set up in Staffordshire. 

Established in October 2011 we put on a minimum of 8 pub talks per year, if not more. . 

If you'd like to get involved or simply stay up-to-date on what we're up to, why not sign up to our mailing-list through our contact form. - It's literally the best way to stay informed about what we're up to.

Failing that, why not follow us on twitter or join us on our facebook group, we're eager to hear from you. ;D

-- Stoke Sitp Team 

 

and other Forensic Faux Pas

Emma McClure

When?
Wednesday, June 6 2018 at 7:00PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

67 Etruria Old Road,
Etruria,
Stoke-On-Trent,
ST1 5PE.

Who?
Emma McClure

What's the talk about?

We've all seen it: A renegade detective pores over the scene of a grisly murder. They find an overlooked clue; a hair, a footprint, a shell casing. Detailed forensic analysis matches the clue to the bad guy, and the bad guy goes to jail. This is how modern day forensics are portrayed in shows such as 'CSI' and 'Silent Witness'; forensic evidence is seen as conclusive when it comes to catching suspects and deciding if someone is guilty in a criminal trial. But, at a time when shows like Serial and Making a Murderer have brought miscarriages of justice to international prominence, Emma McClure will explain how the traces left behind at a crime scene can sometimes lie.

 

The science in areas such as DNA collection has progressed enormously in recent decades allowing for breakthroughs in many old and cold cases. However, we have also seen many high profile exonerations of those previously convicted of the most serious of crimes on seemingly 'conclusive' forensic evidence. This has led to increasing scrutiny of the way it is analysed, interpreted and presented in the courtroom.

 

In this talk, prison lawyer Emma McClure examines the issues with forensic techniques, highlighting the amusing, confusing and sometimes tragic consequences of failing to take a sceptical approach to evidence in the field of forensic science.

£4 per head will get you a ticket in our drinks raffle, two lucky attendees will win a FREE pint on the night.